Faith Based

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Faith Communities
Tolerance of suicide, religion and suicide rates: an ecological and individual study in 19 Western countries.
How Faith Communities Help in Suicide Prevention
One Sabbath: Celebrating Life, Hope, and Reasons to Live
Faith Leaders’ Guide to Self-Care After a Suicide Video
Suicide Prevention Competencies for Faith Leaders: Supporting Life Before, During, and After a Suicidal Crisis
Hope for Life Day Toolkit
The Role of Faith Communities in Preventing Suicide: A Report of an Interfaith Suicide Prevention Dialogue (62 page PDF)
The Role of Faith Community Leaders in Preventing Suicide (9 page PDF)
The Role of Faith Communities in Suicide Prevention webinar
Faith.Hope.Life
Mental Health Sunday - 3rd Sunday in May

Suicide - The Buddhist Perspective
Suicide - The Hindu Perspective
Suicide - The Jewish Perspective
Suicide - The Muslim Perspective
Christian Litanies
Islam - Texts from the Qur'an
Judaism: Sermon Starters
Native American Spiritual Resources
Sermon Starters Shared by Christians and Jews
Texts from the Qur'an
Texts of Hope from the Hebrew Bible
Mental Health Ministries

Common Warning Signs of Suicide
Faith Leaders’ Guide to Self-Care After a Suicide Video
The Role of Faith Communities in Suicide Prevention webinar
Suicide Prevention Competencies for Faith Leaders: Supporting Life Before, During, and Responding to a Member Who May Be at Risk for Suicide
After a Suicidal Crisis
Resources for Community Conversations about Mental Health
Coping with Violence and Traumatic Events
Interfaith Network on Mental Illness
Pathways to Promise
Mental Health Ministries
After a Suicide: Recommendations for Religious Services and Other Public Memorial Observances
Hope for Mental Health
Stephen Ministries
Action Alliance Framework for Successful Messaging
American Association of Pastoral Counselors
Caring Clergy Project: Resources on Mental Illness for Faith Community Leaders
What Religious Communities Can Do In Suicide Prevention (5 page PDF)
Prayers Concerning Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders
Story of Hope and Healing
What Can Religious Communities Do? (2 page PDF)
Interfaith Prayers for Hope
Beyond Body and Soul: Attending to the Mind (Sermon)
Sample Prayers on Faith, Hope, and Life
Judaism (Prayers and Sermons)
Children's Sermon
Sermon Starters - Christianity
What is the Faith.Hope.Life. Campaign? Promotional Flyer
Sample Bulletin Insert One Pager: One Sabbath Celebrating life, hope, and reasons to live
Sample Bulletin Insert Two Pager: One Sabbath Celebrating Life, Hope, and Reasons to Live
A True Story of Hope and Healing
Faith.Hope.Life Campaign Slides
Prayer Guide
Sample Bulletin Insert Handout: One Sabbath Celebrating Life, Hope, and Reasons to Live

Source: theactionalliance.org/faith-hope-life/resources/sermon-starters-shared-christians-and-jew

Tolerance of suicide, religion and suicide rates: an ecological and individual study in 19 Western countries.


Abstract

Background:

Negative associations between religion and suicide, in individuals and countries, may be mediated by the degree to which suicide is tolerated.

Methods:

Linear regression was used to examine ecological associations between suicide tolerance, religion and suicide rates in 19 Western countries in 1989/90. Logistic regression was used to study associations between suicide tolerance and strength of religious belief in 28085 individuals in these countries. The concept of effect modifying function was used to examine whether the strength of the association between suicide tolerance and religious belief in individuals depended on the extent of religious belief in their country.

Results::

Higher female suicide rates were associated with lower aggregate levels of religious belief and, less strongly, religious attendance. These associations were mostly attributable to the association between higher tolerance of suicide and higher suicide rates. In the 28085 subjects suicide tolerance and the strength of religious belief were negatively associated even after adjustment for other religious and sociodemographic variables and general tolerance levels (odds ratios: men 0.74 (95% CI 0.58-0.94), women 0.72 (95% CI 0.60-0.86)). This negative individual-level association was more pronounced in more highly religious countries but this modifying effect of the religious context was apparent for men only.

Conclusions:

Ecological associations between religious variables and suicide rates are stronger for women than men, stronger for measures of belief than observance and mediated by tolerance of suicide. In individuals, stronger religious beliefs are associated with lower tolerance of suicide. Personal religious beliefs and, for men, exposure to a religious environment, may protect against suicide by reducing its acceptability.
Source: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9300520

One Sabbath: Celebrating Life, Hope, and Reasons to Live


In their day-to-day work, faith-based groups already contribute to suicide prevention by increasing hope, supporting emotional well-being, and fostering the development of positive social connections. Faith communities are also critical sources of support during challenging times. These groups can play an important role in identifying individuals in distress and helping them seek help. In addition, they can also support members who have lost a loved one to suicide.

Faith.Hope.Life Campaign

During the weekend of May 15-17, 2020, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's (Action Alliance) Faith.Hope.Life. campaign invites faith communities across the nation to come together to pray for those whose lives have been touched by suicide. Save the date for this coming year and join us for National Weekend of Prayer for Faith, Hope, & Life.

To help faith communities address suicide prevention, the Action Alliance (Faith Communities Task Force) developed the Faith.Hope.Life campaign.

The task force leads Action Alliance efforts to engage faith communities in suicide prevention. Accomplishments to date include the development of the Faith.Hope.Life campaign, which includes a website and many resources, and the annual National Weekend of Prayer for Faith, Hope, and Life.

Provides every faith tradition, philosophy, and denomination with a set of assembled communications aids and spiritual resources to help prevent suicides in their communities

Helps faith communities promote mental and spiritual health as a whole as well as support the needs of family and friends after a suicide event

National Weekend of Prayer for Faith, Hope, & Life

The Action Alliance leads the National Weekend of Prayer for Faith, Hope, and Life—an initiative which invites faith communities across the nation to pray for those whose lives have been touched by suicide.
Source: theactionalliance.org/communities/faith-communities

How Faith Communities Help in Suicide Prevention


Studies show that persons experiencing mental health problems or emotional distress frequently turn to faith communities and their leaders for help. You and your faith community can help in many ways:

Ø Know the facts. Suicide does not discriminate; it can touch people of all ages and classes; all racial, ethnic, and religious groups. However, suicide is also preventable and your faith community can play a role. There is hope and help.

Ø Talk about mental illness. Help your faith members understand mental health problems as being real and treatable in the same way that physical health problems are. Speak and pray about mental illness just as you would about physical illnesses, such as cancer, heart disease, or diabetes.

Ø Promote connectedness. Fellowship groups, choirs, service work, worship—all are ways people connect in faith communities. Such connections let people know they are not alone and that they are cared for.

Ø “Narratives of hope.” Faith communities share stories—from the Bible, the Koran, or other sacred texts--of how people have overcome adversity and experienced God’s presence in times of struggle and hardship. They also share the stories of their own lives--their faith and courage—that can give hope and strength to others.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (24 hours) 800-273-8255; Crisis Text Line text SOS to741741
Pathways2Promise: Ministry and Mental Illness:
pathways@mimh.edu Source:theactionalliance.org/sites/default/files/how_faith_communities_help_in_sucide_prevention_20140820_2.pdf

One Sabbath: Celebrating Life, Hope, and Reasons to Live


There is a reason for each of us to be here—alive—the young and old, the weak andstrong, the sick and the healthy. Our community of faith should be a place where we protect and comfort each other when faced with the issue of suicide. This week, we celebrate reasons to live—today and every day.

Let’s be honest, life can sometimes feel overwhelming and challenging. Sometimes events can leave us feeling worthless, abandoned, or isolated. [Insert the name of your faith community] seeks to be a caring community that focuses on the hope that, in God’s time, life’s challenges can be overcome and bad feelings will subside. Through connections within our own community, we can find the strength to live out each day as God gives it. If that living ever becomes unbearable for any one of us, we should know how to access and provide connections and support, includingthe National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK), a free, confidential crisis line available 24/7, anywhere in the U.S. Crisis Text Line text SOS to 741741

Faith.Hope.Life. is a reminder that God loves you and knows your struggles. Even when you walk through the valley of the shadows and feel that you don’t have the strength to face another day, God is with you. God can give you help through friends, loved ones, co-workers, members of your faith community, your [insert the term you use for faith leaders: rabbis, pastors, imams, priests], and professionals such as counselors, therapists, and doctors. They can be God’s heart and God’s listening ear when you feel most troubled and alone.

If you know someone (including yourself) who needs help with the difficult challenges of life, has lost hope or withdrawn from others, feels trapped like there is no way out, or has no will to go on, reach out. Let others help. It could make all the difference. Where there is help there is hope.

 
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