Death with Dignity Act (DWDA)

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Oregon's Death with Dignity Act

Lots of Q&A

Oregon Death with Dignity Act (DWDA)

The number of assisted suicide deaths in Oregon - 1998-2019
Oregon Death with Dignity Act - By Sex - 1998-2019
Oregon Death with Dignity Act - Age - 1998-2019

Helping Younger People Cope with Death and Funerals
Oregon lawmakers consider expansion to Death with Dignity law - 3/20/19
Euthanasia
Growth House

Oregon's Death with Dignity Act


Summary

Oregon's Death with Dignity Act allows terminally ill Oregon residents to obtain and use prescriptions from their physicians for self-administered, lethal medications. Physicians and patients who follow the act's requirements are protected from criminal prosecution, and the choice of legal physician-assisted suicide cannot affect the status of a patient's health or life insurance policy.

Oregonians first passed the act in a November 1994 referendum by a margin of 51% to 49%. However, a legal injunction delayed its immediate implementation. It was not until 1997 when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the injunction that physician-assisted suicide became a legal option for terminally ill patients in Oregon. Since that time, 70 people have ended their lives with the help of a doctor. But, people's ability to use the law is once again threatened.

The latest issue is whether assisted suicide is a “legitimate medical purpose” within the meaning of the 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act. Under the act, physicians can prescribe federally regulated drugs for legitimate purposes only. In a November 2001 letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft, citing United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Cooperative, 532 U.S. 483 (2001), stated that assisted suicide is inconsistent with the public interest. Oregon's attorney general was successful in obtaining a temporary restraining order on Ashcroft's directive. A hearing on the directive is expected in April.

In Oakland Cannabis Buyers', the U.S. Supreme Court held cooperatives that distributed marijuana for medical purposes violated the Controlled Substance Act because marijuana has no proven medical value, a necessity for distributing controlled substances. OLR Report 2001-R-0894 provides a more detailed analysis of this case.

As stated earlier, 70 patients have died from physician-assisted suicide since 1997. Most of these patients had some form of cancer and stated the fear of losing autonomy as their primary reason for wanting to end their lives. Oregon's health department does not keep statistics on the total number of physicians writing legal prescriptions, but it does report that physicians wrote a total of 96 lethal prescriptions between 1997 and 2001.

Death With Dignity - Oregon's Assisted Suicide Law

The Death with Dignity Act (ORS §§ 127.800 to 127.897) allows terminally ill Oregon residents to obtain and use prescriptions from their physicians for self-administered, lethal medications. Under the Act, ending one's life in accordance with the law does not constitute suicide. However, the law is referred to as “physician-assisted suicide” because it allows people to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of lethal medications prescribed by a physician for that purpose.

The Death with Dignity Act legalizes physician-assisted suicide, but specifically prohibits euthanasia, where a physician or other person directly administers a medication to end another's life.

To request a prescription for lethal medications, the Death with Dignity Act requires that a patient voluntarily express his wish to die and be:

  • an adult (age 18 or older),
  • an Oregon resident,
  • capable (able to make and communicate health care decisions), and
  • diagnosed with a terminal illness (incurable and irreversible) that will lead to death within six months.

Patients meeting these requirements are eligible to request a prescription for lethal medication from a licensed Oregon physician. To receive a prescription for lethal medication, the following steps must be fulfilled:

  • the patient must make two oral requests to his physician, separated by at least 15 days;
  • the patient must provide a written, witnessed request to his physician (two witnesses);
  • the prescribing physician and a consulting physician must confirm the diagnosis and prognosis;
  • the prescribing physician and a consulting physician must determine whether the patient is capable;
  • if either physician believes the patient's judgment is impaired by a psychiatric or psychological disorder, he must refer the patient for a psychological examination;
  • the prescribing physician must inform the patient of feasible alternatives to assisted suicide, including comfort care, hospice care, and pain control; and
  • the prescribing physician must request, but may not require, the patient to notify his next-of-kin of the prescription request.

To comply with the law, physicians must report to Oregon Health Services (OHS) all prescriptions for lethal medications. Reporting is not required if patients begin the request process but never receive a prescription. Physicians must inform pharmacists of the prescribed medication's ultimate use. Physicians and patients who adhere to the act's requirements are protected from criminal prosecution, and the choice of legal physician-assisted suicide cannot affect the status of a patient's health or life insurance policies. Physicians and health care systems are under no obligation to participate in the Death with Dignity Act.
Source: www.cga.ct.gov/2002/rpt/2002-R-0077.htm and
Source: www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/EVALUATIONRESEARCH/DEATHWITHDIGNITYACT/Documents/year20.pdf

Q&A


How long do you have to live in Oregon to qualify for death with dignity?

Be at least 18 years old. an Oregon resident. mentally capable of making and communicating health care decisions, and. diagnosed with a terminal illness that will result in death within six months.

Which is true of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act?

Q: What is Oregon's Death with Dignity Act? A: The Death with Dignity Act (DWDA) is a permissive law that allows terminally ill Oregonians to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of a lethal dose of medication, expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose.

How much does it cost to die with dignity?

To users of the powdered form, the cost is between $400 and $500. The dose of secobarbital (brand name Seconal) prescribed under death with dignity laws costs $3,000 to $5,000.

Where is assisted death legal?

Physician-assisted death or "aid in dying" is legal in eight jurisdictions: California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Montana, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. ... Nevertheless, assisted suicide remains illegal in a majority of states across the nation.

What medication is given for death with dignity?

Currently in Oregon, secobarbital is the medication most commonly prescribed for physician-assisted suicide, followed by pentobarbital. The lethal dose prescribed is typically 9 g of secobarbital in capsules or 10 g of pentobarbital liquid, to be consumed at one time.

Will life insurance pay for death with dignity?

Most life insurance policies contain something called a contestability clause. It generally states that within a two-year period of purchase, the insurance company will not pay out if the policyholder commits suicide. Dec 7, 2009

Do you have to be terminally ill for euthanasia?

They believe that one does not need to be terminally ill in order to qualify for euthanasia or assisted suicide, only "hopelessly ill." ... Euthanasia of persons who do not have an imminent terminal illness (where they are expected to die within six months) is seen by opponents as having eugenic and economic overtones.

How long does the average hospice patient live?

On average, the preactive phase of dying may last approximately two weeks, while on average, the active phase of dying lasts about three days. We say "on average" because there are often exceptions to the rule. Hospice Patients Alliance - Signs of Approaching Death

What is the process of euthanasia for humans?

Euthanasia is performed by the attending physician administering a fatal dose of a suitable drug to the patient on his or her express request. ... Palliative sedation is not a form of euthanasia: the patient is simply rendered unconscious with pain reducing drugs and eventually dies from natural causes.

Euthanasia, assisted suicide and non-resuscitation on request ...

https://www.government.nl/.../euthanasia-assisted-suicide-and-non-resuscitation-on-requ...

Which states allow euthanasia?

Euthanasia is illegal in most of the United States. Assisted suicide/assisted death is legal in Washington, D.C. and the states of California, Colorado, Oregon, Vermont, Hawaii, and Washington; its status is disputed in Montana.

Why euthanasia is wrong?

Some non-religious arguments against euthanasia include: euthanasia would weaken society's respect for the value and importance of human life. proper palliative care is available which reduces or removes the need for people to be in pain. it would lead to worse care for the terminally ill. (Editor's note: None of those make Euthanasia wrong.)

Euthanasia - Revision 3 - GCSE Religious Studies - BBC Bitesize

https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/z3fbwmn/revision/3

Why is euthanasia a ethical issue?

This is an ethical issue because it is controversial – it is about life and death decisions. ... Euthanasia means 'a good death' (1) and it is concerned with a person's right to choose to end their own life (and get help to do so) if they choose.

The ethical issue I am analysing is euthanasia in New Zealand. This ...

https://www.nzqa.govt.nz/assets/qualifications-and.../91464-EXP-student1-001.pdf

Is euthanasia morally acceptable?

The person in favour of euthanasia argues that giving everybody the right to have a good death through euthanasia is acceptable as a universal principle, and that euthanasia is therefore morally acceptable.

BBC - Ethics - Euthanasia: Pro-euthanasia arguments

www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/euthanasia/infavour/infavour_1.shtml

What does Christianity say about euthanasia?

General Christian view. Christians are mostly against euthanasia. The arguments are usually based on the beliefs that life is given by God, and that human beings are made in God's image. Some churches also emphasise the importance of not interfering with the natural process of death. Aug 3, 2009 (Editor's note: Organized religion tells people what to believe, many of which go against established scientific knowledge, i.e., "Don't eat pork." I trust my inner knowing and I am the only one that has to suffer the consequences, if indeed, there are any. The fact remains that no one really knows that those supposed consequences are)

BBC - Religions - Christianity: Euthanasia

www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/christianethics/euthanasia_1.shtml

Is euthanasia an ethical issue?

Euthanasia is against the law in the UK where it is illegal to help anyone kill themselves. Voluntary euthanasia or assisted suicide can lead to imprisonment of up to 14 years. The issue has been at the centre of very heated debates for many years and is surrounded by religious, ethical and practical considerations.

BBC - Ethics - Euthanasia: Ethics of euthanasia - introduction

www.bbc.com/ethics/euthanasia/overview/introduction.shtml

Is euthanasia a human right?

The position of international human rights law with respect to voluntary euthanasia is not explicit or clearly defined. Article 6(1) of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) provides: “Every human being has the inherent right to life. This right shall be protected by law.

Human Rights and Euthanasia | Australian Human Rights Commission

https://www.humanrights.gov.au/our-work/rights-and.../human-rights-and-euthanasia

When was euthanasia first used?

The word "euthanasia" was first used in a medical context by Francis Bacon in the 17th century, to refer to an easy, painless, happy death, during which it was a "physician's responsibility to alleviate the 'physical sufferings' of the body."

Euthanasia - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euthanasia

How many terminally ill patients want euthanasia?

Research on 988 terminally ill patients found that 60 percent of them supported euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide in hypothetical situations, but only 11 percent seriously considered such action for themselves.

Study relates desire for death in the terminally ill to depression ...

www.apa.org/monitor/mar01/terminal.aspx

What is the difference between euthanasia and death with dignity?

Physician-assisted suicide entails making lethal means available to the patient to be used at a time of the patient's own choosing. By contrast, voluntary active euthanasia entails the physician taking an active role in carrying out the patient's request, and usually involves intravenous delivery of a lethal substance.

What is the Difference Between Assisted Dying and Euthanasia ...

https://www.worldrtd.net/qanda/what-difference-between-assisted-dying-and-euthanasia

What countries allow assisted death?

Assisted suicide is legal in some countries, under certain circumstances, including Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Colombia, Switzerland, and parts of the United States and Australia.

Assisted suicide - Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_suicide

What does voluntary euthanasia mean?

Voluntary euthanasia is the practice of ending a life in a painless manner. Voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) have been the focus of great controversy in recent years.

Voluntary euthanasia - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voluntary_euthanasia

Is mercy killing legal?

Doctors are allowed to prescribe lethal doses of medicine to terminally ill patients in five US states. Euthanasia, however, is illegal. In recent years, the "aid in dying" movement has made incremental gains, but the issue remains controversial. Oregon was the first US state to legalise assisted suicide.Jul 17, 2014

Euthanasia and assisted suicide laws around the world | Society ...

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jul/17/euthanasia-assisted-suicide-laws-world

What is the right to die law?

The right to die is supported and rejected by many. ... If one had a right to live, then one must have the right to die, both on their terms. Death is a natural process of life thus there should not be any laws to prevent it if patient seeks to end it.

Right to die - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_die

What is the process of euthanasia for humans?

Euthanasia is performed by the attending physician administering a fatal dose of a suitable drug to the patient on his or her express request. ... Palliative sedation is not a form of euthanasia: the patient is simply rendered unconscious with pain reducing drugs and eventually dies from natural causes.

Euthanasia, assisted suicide and non-resuscitation on request ...

https://www.government.nl/.../euthanasia-assisted-suicide-and-non-resuscitation-on-requ...

What are the types of euthanasia?

Euthanasia comes in several different forms, each of which brings a different set of rights and wrongs.

  • Active and passive euthanasia. In active euthanasia a person directly and deliberately causes the patient's death. ...
  • Voluntary and involuntary euthanasia. ...
  • Indirect euthanasia. ...
  • Assisted suicide.

Is terminal illness painful?

Pain in terminal illness. Pain is common for people living with a terminal illness. Pain affects different people in different ways. With the right treatment and support, pain can usually be managed.Jun 1, 2018

Pain in terminal illness - Marie Curie

https://www.mariecurie.org.uk/help/support/terminal-illness/...pain.../managing-pain

Are terminally ill patients in pain?

BACKGROUND: Terminally ill patients commonly experience substantial pain. ... FINDINGS: 496 (50%) terminally ill patients reported moderate or severe pain. 514 (52%) individuals had seen a primary-care physician for treatment of pain in the previous 4 weeks and 198 (20%) saw a pain specialist.Apr 28, 2001

Understanding the experience of pain in terminally ill patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/11343734

Is heart disease a terminal illness?

Terminal illness. ... Terminal illness or end-stage disease is an incurable disease that cannot be adequately treated and is reasonably expected to result in the death of the patient. This term is more commonly used for progressive diseases such as cancer or advanced heart disease than for trauma.

Terminal illness - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminal_illness

Can doctors kill patients?

Though euthanasia is not legal in the United States, doctors can assist people to kill themselves. ... In these cases the patient takes the legal dose of poison themselves, it is not given by the doctor. It is euthanasia when the doctor has the main role in ending the patient's life by giving the poison.

Euthanasia - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://simple.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euthanasia

What is the difference between euthanasia and physician assisted death?

Is physician-assisted suicide the same as euthanasia? No. Physician-assisted suicide refers to the physician providing the means for death, most often with a presciption. ... Euthanasia generally means that the physician would act directly, for instance by giving a lethal injection, to end the patient's life.

Is physician-assisted suicide the same as euthanasia? | The World ...

https://www.worldrtd.net/qanda/physician-assisted-suicide-same-euthanasia

What is the difference between euthanasia and mercy killing?

The Difference Between Euthanasia and Killing. ... Euthanasia n. Also called mercy killing. The act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding extreme medical measures, a person or animal suffering from an incurable, especially a painful, disease or condition (Random House Dictionary).

The Difference Between Euthanasia and Killing | Alley Cat Allies

https://www.alleycat.org/resources/the-difference-between-euthanasia-and-killing/

How many deaths are caused by euthanasia?

Euthanasia and assisted suicide rates around the world. According to a peer-reviewed paper published last year in the respected journal JAMA: Between 0.3% to 4.6% of all deaths are reported as euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide in jurisdictions where they are legal.Mar 2, 2017

In places where it's legal, how many people are ending their lives ...

theconversation.com/in-places-where-its-legal-how-many-people-are-ending-their-lives-...

What are the most common terminal illnesses?

While cancer is among the most common terminal illnesses, others include AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia, emphysema, heart disease, liver disease, multiple sclerosis, renal or ...Aug 16, 2010

Coping with Terminal Illness - Pharmacy Times

https://www.pharmacytimes.com/publications/issue/.../counselingterminalillness-0810

What is terminal cancer symptoms?

Physical symptoms other than pain often contribute to suffering near the end of life. In addition to pain, the most common symptoms in the terminal stages of an illness such as cancer or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are fatigue, anorexia, cachexia, nausea, vomiting, constipation, delirium and dyspnea.Sep 1, 2001

Management of Common Symptoms in Terminally Ill Patients: Part I ...

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0901/p807.html

What are the signs of end stage heart failure?

The symptoms of end-stage congestive heart failure include dyspnea, chronic cough or wheezing, edema, nausea or lack of appetite, a high heart rate, and confusion or impaired thinking. Learn about the hospice eligibility requirements for end-stage heart failure.Feb 16, 2017

End Stages of Heart Failure: What to Expect - Crossroads Hospice

https://www.crossroadshospice.com/...care.../end-stages-of-heart-failure-what-to-expect/

Can heart failure get better?

However, with treatment, signs and symptoms of heart failure can improve, and the heart sometimes becomes stronger. Treatment may help you live longer and reduce your chance of dying suddenly. Doctors sometimes can correct heart failure by treating the underlying cause.Dec 23, 2017

Heart failure - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-failure/diagnosis.../drc-20373148

What are the 4 stages of congestive heart failure?

Stages. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and obesity are all risk factors for CHF. There are four different stages of heart failure: A, B, C, and D.Oct 18, 2017

Congestive heart failure: Stages, symptoms, and causes

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317848.php

How many deaths are caused by doctors every year?

According to a recent study by Johns Hopkins, more than 250,000 people in the United States die every year because of medical mistakes, making it the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer.Feb 22, 2018 (Editor's note: And that doesn't include the failure of doctors and nurses, especially in the ER, asking a patient upon discharge "Have you been thinking about commiting suicide recently? Since 90% of those who killed themselves but who had had a visit with a medicl professional in the last year and the 45% within 30 days of their suicide, the missed opportunity to identify people in crisis are missed by not asking a simple question.)

Medical errors third-leading cause of death in America - CNBC.com

https://www.cnbc.com/.../medical-errors-third-leading-cause-of-death-in-america.html

What is it called when you help someone commit a crime?

A person who learns of the crime after it is committed and helps the criminal to conceal it, or aids the criminal in escaping, or simply fails to report the crime, is known as an "accessory after the fact".

Accessory (legal term) - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessory_(legal_term)

Should passive euthanasia be allowed?

Many people make a moral distinction between active and passive euthanasia. They think that it is acceptable to withhold treatment and allow a patient to die, but that it is never acceptable to kill a patient by a deliberate act.

BBC - Ethics - Euthanasia: Active and passive euthanasia

www.bbc.com/ethics/euthanasia/overview/activepassive_1.shtml

What are the diseases that Cannot be cured?

Some diseases can be cured. Others, like hepatitis B, have no cure. The person will always have the condition, but medical treatments can help to manage the disease. Medical professionals use medicine, therapy, surgery, and other treatments to help lessen the symptoms and effects of a disease.

What's the Difference Between a Treatment and a Cure? (for Teens ...

https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/curable.html

What disease have no cure?

Progeria – Progeria has no cure and a very small amount of treatments. However, there is a medicine in the making that is undergoing testing and trials that may lead to a cure. The disorder usually leads to death at a young age. Polio – While there is a vaccine to prevent polio, there is no cure for it.

List of incurable diseases - Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_incurable_diseases

Can a terminal illness be cured?

By definition, there is not a cure or adequate treatment for terminal illnesses. However, some kinds of medical treatments may be appropriate anyway, such as treatment to reduce pain or ease breathing. Some terminally ill patients stop all debilitating treatments to reduce unwanted side effects.

Terminal illness - Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminal_illness

What is the last sense to go when you die?

Being there at the end. Remember: hearing is thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process, so never assume the person is unable to hear you. Talk as if they can hear you, even if they appear to be unconscious or restless.

Being with someone when they die | Dying Matters

https://www.dyingmatters.org/page/being-someone-when-they-die

What are the signs that someone is actively dying?

The signs and symptoms of active dying include: Long pauses in breathing; patients breathing patterns may also be very irregular. Patient is in a coma, or semi-coma, or cannot be awoken. ... Patient's skin changes color (mottling) and their extremities may feel cold to the touch.

What is Active Dying? Active Dying Definition: Crossroads

https://www.crossroadshospice.com/hospice-caregiver-support/.../what-is-active-dying/

How long does the active phase of dying last?

There are two phases which arise prior to the actual time of death: the "pre-active phase of dying," and the "active phase of dying." On average, the preactive phase of dying may last approximately two weeks, while on average, the active phase of dying lasts about three days.

Hospice Patients Alliance - Signs of Approaching Death

https://hospicepatients.org/hospic60.html

What are the 5 signs of death?

How to tell if death is near

  • Decreasing appetite. A decreased appetite may be a sign that death is near. ...
  • Sleeping more. ...
  • Becoming less social. ...
  • Changing vital signs. ...
  • Changing toilet habits. ...
  • Weakening muscles. ...
  • Dropping body temperature. ...
  • Experiencing confusion.

More items...•Jan 31, 2018

Signs of death: 11 symptoms and what to expect

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320794.php

How long does it take to die death with dignity?

Most patients fall asleep peacefully about 10 minutes after drinking the life ending medication, and die in 1-3 hours. In about 5 percent of patients, it takes longer than 6 hours to die, but they sleep comfortably the whole time, until death ensues. How to Access and Use Death with Dignity Laws

How much does life support cost?

Medicare paid an average of $153 per day, per person, in 2016 to cover hospice care, in the following categories: Routine home care – $193 per day for services that patients need on a day-to-day basis. End-of-life Options - Hospice Costs & Who Pays for Care - Debt.org

How much does hospice cost?

Otherwise Medicare usually ends up paying the majority of hospice services, which for inpatient stays can sometimes run up to $10,000 per month, depending on the level of care required. On average, however, it is usually around $150 for home care, and up to $500 for general inpatient care per day. Sep 26, 2018 Auburn Crest Hospice | How Much Does Hospice Care Cost?

Who pays for hospice care at home?

Hospice care is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid in most states, the Department of Veterans Affairs, most private insurance plans, HMOs, and other managed care organizations. Who provides and pays for hospice care? - American Cancer Society

Is an autopsy required if you die at home?

If an autopsy is required by law, there is no charge to the family. If the family is requesting an autopsy, they can ask that a hospital do an autopsy on a person who died there. ... Most health plans do not pay for autopsies. Mar 20, 2018 Immediately After Someone Dies - Clicklaw Wikibooks

Does insurance pay for life support?

Health insurance may pay for some level of life support, depending on the specific details of each policy. ... Life support measures cover a wide scope of services necessary to keep someone alive. In some cases, those measures have ceased when the insurance coverage ran out. Does Health Insurance Cover Life Support?

What happens when someone is found dead at home?

When a person dies at home. ... If the death is unexpected then you should call the police. If the deceased is to be cremated, let the doctor know. The body can then be laid out in the home or collected by the funeral directors, family or whoever you chose to collect it.

When a person dies at home | What to do when someone has died ...

Who do you call when someone passes away at home?

If the person dies at home without hospice care, call 911, and have in hand a do-not-resuscitate document if it exists. Without one, paramedics will generally start emergency procedures and, except where permitted to pronounce death, take the person to an emergency room for a doctor to make the declaration. Checklist - What to Do When Someone Dies - Consumer Reports

Can you survive hospice?

To qualify for hospice care, two doctors must certify that a patient is expected to live no more than six months. ... But the rate actually varies widely from one care organization to another. Some hospices discharge fewer than 2 percent of their patients prior to death, while others discharge more than 80 percent.Aug 11, 2017

Hospice, Designed For The Dying, Is Discharging Many Live ... - NPR

https://www.npr.org/.../08/.../nearly-1-in-5-hospice-patients-discharged-while-still-alive

How much does hospice cost per month?

But such care can be expensive, costing upward of $10,000 a month, according to the Health Affairs study. That puts hospices in a financial bind. Last year, the Medicare program paid a base rate of $151 per day to cover all routine hospice services, adjusted for geographic differences.Jan 21, 2013

Hospices, Wary Of Costs, May Be Discouraging Patients With High ...

https://khn.org/news/012213-michelle-andrews-on-hospice-care/

What are the signs that death is near?

A Guide To Understanding End-Of-Life Signs & Symptoms.
  • Coolness. Hands, arms, feet, and legs may be increasingly cool to the touch. ...
  • Confusion. They may not know time or place and may not be able to identify people around them. ...
  • Sleeping. ...
  • Incontinence. ...
  • Restlessness. ...
  • Congestion. ...
  • Urine decrease. ...
  • Fluid and food decrease.
  • More items

What are the 10 signs of death?

 

What are the signs that someone is actively dying?

 

Do you pay for hospice?

 

Are hospices free?

 

Who qualifies for hospice care?

 

What is the right to die law?

 

How much does it cost to die?

 

Where is physician assisted death legal in the world?

 

How much does assisted dying cost?

 

What happens if no cause of death is found?

 

How much does Death with Dignity cost?

The number assisted suicide deaths in Oregon


The number assisted suicide deaths were: 77 in 2012, 71 in 2011, 65 in 2010 and 59 in 2009. There has been a 30% increase in the number of assisted suicide deaths in Oregon since 2009.

The number of prescriptions for assisted suicide were 115 in 2012, 114 in 2011, 97 in 2010 and 95 in 2009. There has been a 21% increase in the number of prescriptions for assisted suicide in Oregon since 2009.
Source: www.lifenews.com/2013/01/30/oregon-assisted-suicide-deaths-hit-record-high-in-2012/

Oregon Death with Dignity Act (DWDA)


The Oregon Death with Dignity Act (DWDA) allows terminally ill Oregonians who meet specific qualifications to end their lives through the voluntary selfadministration of a lethal dose of medications, expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose. The Act requires the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), Public Health Division, to collect information about the patients and physicians who participate in the Act and to publish an annual statistical report.

The DWDA outlines specific patient requirements to participate. A patient must be: 1) 18 years of age or older, 2) a resident of Oregon, 3) capable of making and communicating health care decisions for him/herself, and 4) diagnosed with a terminal illness that will lead to death within six (6) months. It is up to the attending and consulting physicians to determine whether these requirements have been met, and to report that fact to OHA at the time a prescription is written. If OHA identifies any issues of noncompliance with the statutory requirements, that fact is reported to the appropriate licensing board.

Characteristics and end-of-life care of 1,461 DWDA patients who have died from ingesting a lethal dose of medication as of January 1, 2019, by year, Oregon, 1998–2018
Source: www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/EVALUATIONRESEARCH/DEATHWITHDIGNITYACT/Documents/year20.pdf

Oregon Death with Dignity Act - By Sex - 1998-2019

As of 052519

Year
This Year
Cume from 1998

Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total

2018

87 (52%)
81 (48%)
168
763 (52%)
698 (48%)
1,461

2017

83
60
143
668
607
1,275

2016

72
61
133
582
545
1,127

2015

56
76
132
509
482
991

2014

56
49
105
453
406
859

2913

44
27
71
396
356
752

2012

39
38
77
347
326
673

2011

26
45
71
308
288
596

2010

38
27
72
282
243
525

2009

31
28
59
244
216
460

2008

30
30
60
213
158
371

2007

26
23
49
183
158
341

2006

26
20
46
157
135
292

2005

23
15
38
131
115
246

2004

18
19
37
108
100
208

2003

19
23
42
90
81
171

2002

27

71
58
129

2001

8
13
21

2000

12
15
27

1999

16

1998

11

Legend: Red = Highest ever
Source:
www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/EVALUATIONRESEARCH/DEATHWITHDIGNITYACT/Pages/ar-index.aspx


Oregon Death with Dignity Act - Age - 1998-2019

As of 052519

Year
18-34
18-44
25-34
35-44
45-64
45-54
55-64
65-74
65-84
75-84
85^
Total
Cume

2018

0

2

9
24
50

54
29
168
1,459

2017

0

2

3
23
46

43
26
143
1.295

2016

1

1

6
18
52

31
24
133
1,127

2015

1

5

2
21
41

30
32
132
991

2014

1

2

3
28
29

23
19
105
859

2913

0

1

6
15
23

17
9
71
752

2012

0

1

8
16
23

18
11
77
673

2011

0

1

5
16
23

18
8
71
596

2010

0

1

5
13
19

15
12
65
525

2009

2

1

2
9
13

24
8
59
460

2008

0

1

1
12
21

14
11
60
371

2007

1

2

3
18
11

11
na
46
341

2006

0

1

2
10
11

15
7
46
292

2005

1

11

21

5
38
246

2004

1

1

9
8
7

10
1
37
208

2003

0

2

4
8
9

14
5
42
171

2002

2 c
3 c

10 c
21 c
46 c

37 c
10 c

129 c

2001

2000

1999

1998

Legend: Red = Highest ever
Source:
www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/EVALUATIONRESEARCH/DEATHWITHDIGNITYACT/Pages/ar-index.aspx

Practice of Assisted Suicide in Switzerland


Assisted suicide (voluntary euthanasia) has been legal in Switzerland for Sixty Years! This article explains how it works there, including statistics.
Source: www.finalexit.org/swiss.html

Growth House


Resources for bereavement and grief, death and dying, death with dignity, euthanasia, hospice, palliative care, suicide, terminal illness, AIDS, HIV, and related topics.
Source: www.growthhouse.org/default.html

Newsbytes


Our Hero - Dr. Jack Keborkian


Dr. Jack Kevorkian was convicted in April 1999 of murder. Photographed by the Michigan Department of Corrections, Kevorkian is serving a prison sentence of 10 to 25 years. The euthanasia crusader's conviction stemmed from his assistance in the suicide of a 52-year-old man suffering from Lou Gehrig's disease. A videotape of that suicide later aired on the CBS newsmagazine "60 Minutes," and was used as evidence against him during his Oakland County Circuit Court trial.
Source:
www.thesmokinggun.com/mugshots/jkevorkianmug1.htm

The Pope's Message To Doctors


Pope John Paul II told a group of doctors that resorting to extreme measures to try to keep alive the terminally ill at all costs does not respect the patient. Read the story and comments from a Harvard physician.
Source: www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/22030/8896/347656.html

UK Doctors Forced to be Ethical


Doctors could be struck off the medical register if they insist on giving treatment to critically ill patients against their wishes, the General Medical Council (GMC) has said. In its first guidance on 'life-prolonging' treatment, the GMC tells doctors that they are legally bound to accept patients‚ decisions.
Source: London Daily Telegraph

* * *

Death usually comes too early or too late. - - English Proverb

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 052619